Why does my motorcycle blow white smoke? Here are 2 primary reasons

Motorcycle blowing white smoke

If you are wondering why does my motorcycle blow white smoke instead of regular transparent smoke then this is the post to read.

A motorcycle tends to release a combination of blue, gray, black, and white smoke and if you see only white smoke coming out that means something is wrong with its functionality.

In some cases, it may blow for a few minutes and disappear, but if it remains constant, these are the reasons you should look for.

Why does my motorcycle blow white smoke?

White smoke is an indication that your motorcycle is running with a leakage in the coolant system causing the engine to overheat.

Coolant leakage occurs due to a blown head gasket, leaking or cracked cylinder, and damaged engine block.

When the coolant oil enters the engine chamber it starts combusting with the fuel that generates thick white smoke.

In some cases, a thin white vapor released during the start is often confused with white smoke.

Such steamy vapor is very common in the event of condensation and heat mixing up because of the outside temperature (cold weather). There is nothing to worry about here.

However, thick white smoke is a serious concern that should be identified and addressed as soon as possible to keep yourself and your bike protected from dangerous hazards.

Blown head gasket

A blown head gasket could be the first thing to inspect in case of white smoke. Gaskets are meant to provide a layer of protection between two parts. In the case of a motorcycle, it keeps the coolant oil and the engine block from clashing with each other.

Motorcycle head gasket

When the head gasket is damaged or worn out it starts to develop cracks. These cracks or gaps allow the coolant oil to enter the engine mixing up with the fuel.

Depending on the extent of leakage and combustion of coolant oil and fuel, white smoke begins to generate and released into the air.

One of the ways to know that you are running with a damaged gasket is the burning smell of coolant which is very different from the regular fuel smell.

Also, look for the engine temperature. If there is a sudden rise it is time to check the condition of the gaskets.

Head gaskets are replaceable parts. With time and usage, these should be replaced periodically with new ones.

Riding with damaged head gaskets is very risky. Take your motorcycle to the nearest service center or a professional mechanic to replace the gaskets immediately.

Damaged cylinder

A cranked cylinder head is a sign of a major problem. If not in the head gasket, a coolant fluid can make its way into the cylinder head that is cracked or has a hole.

The cylinder head can be damaged due to overheating, unbalanced air and fuel ratio, or non-maintenance for a long time.

Motorcycle cylinder

The position of the cylinder head is on top of the engine block which also accommodates valve seats. Even the engine block is vulnerable to damages that will allow coolant leakages.

In such a scenario, when the coolant liquid enters the cylinder head it starts burning itself in the combustion chamber. This mixture produces white smoke coming out of the exhaust pipe.

The combination of a defective head gasket and cylinder head can impact the performance of the engine badly. The rate of combustion which depends on the piston rings may be reduced.

These are the major signs that your motorcycle needs urgent attention from an inspection and servicing point of view.

Replace the necessary parts such as gaskets, or piston rings, and repair the damage to the cylinder immediately to avoid bigger issues and physical injuries.

Type of motorcycle engines causing white smokes

White smoke is adherent to the type of engine stroke your motorcycle has. The scenarios covered above are mainly pertaining to 4-stroke engines.

A 2-stroke engine plays differently. While the damages to gaskets, cylinders, and pistons remain evident the coolant oil (2T) in this version of bikes is directly mixed with the petrol.

So here the problem of white smoke can arise upfront if the mixture of oil and fuel is incorrect (unbalanced). If you see white smoke coming out from a 2-stroke bike, check the level of oil and fuel first and ensure they are even.

Apart from the white smoke, an unbalanced oil and fuel ratio is a risky situation that can also lead to sparks and bigger fires.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can you continue driving a motorcycle with white smoke?

No. It is dangerous to continue driving a motorcycle with white smoke as it may cause severe damage to the engine and other vital parts. It is also risky for your own safety.

It is highly recommended to discontinue your journey and take your motorcycle for repairs asap in case of white smoke.

Can I fix the white smoke myself?

The main causes of white smoke are related to technical faults pertaining to the replacement of metal parts like gaskets, and cylinder heads. Under such circumstances, it is better to perform the repairs or replacement through a recognized technician.

However, instances like unbalanced oil and fuel ratio and release of white vapor in cold weather can be self-fixed with some precaution and patience.

How much does it cost to fix the white smoke issue in a motorcycle?

It depends on the type of motorcycle you own. However, repairing and replacement of parts like head gaskets, piston rings, and cylinder heads can cost anywhere between $200 to $1500.

Final thoughts

The sight of a motorcycle blowing white smoke isn’t funny. We have seen the causes and the damage it can do to your motorcycle.

There is a variety of issues that leads to white smoke however, these causes are pertinent mainly due to overheating and non-regular maintenance.

In any case, it is important to take action as soon as you notice white smoke. Depending on the type of bike, check for the fuel and oil ratio, and the weather conditions it suffered.

Secondly, look for the overheating signs on the engine, inspect the leakages and see if there are any damages on the gasket, and cylinder heads.

Take necessary steps to diagnose the issues immediately and keep your motorcycle always maintained to avoid white smoke and other issues in the future.

I hope you have understood the concept of white smoke and its causes by reading this post and are now in a better position to handle it.

Your valuable feedback and comments are most welcome in case you want to highlight or add any other instance that leads a motorcycle to blow white smoke.

Arif

A driving enthusiast since 2006! I am also the author and owner of THECARPLUS.

I spend time behind the steering when I am not in front of a computer.

In my spare time, I get involved with the technicians who work on my car as and when needed.
The information you get on this website is part of the knowledge I gain through these professionals as well as further research done by me personally.

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